For a long time I have clipped and pasted in yearly binders the published copy of a photo provided by staff at the La Porte County Historical Society Museum. These are all available at the Museum for visitors to view in the Fern Eddy Schultz Research Library. These do not get a lot of usage but on the occasion that they do, it seems to be of significance to provide. I personally find the photos of value but sometimes the captions are lacking correct or sufficient information for my purposes. Of course, this is a problem with most of our personal photograph collections – and it will not be any better when we look back at the photos we take today if they even remain available. We know, today, most everyone is a photographer and the majority of photos taken are not printed out with any caption information whatsoever.

Over the years, I have noted repetitive submissions of many of the photos. One that comes to mind is the photo of what is now The Goods (constructed as Interlaken School) and the rec/gym that was constructed next to it. I often wondered about the photo which shows the school building (The Goods) located on the south side of the rec/gym building and as far as I know, no one questioned it. Knowing the location, it would immediately seem impossible space-wise for the rec/gym to have been on the north side of the school. This photo which has been so often used is obviously a photo of the back side of the school and rec/gym, not a view from Pine Lake Avenue.

Local Lore is a regular column by La Porte County Historian Fern Eddy Schultz.

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